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If you want to be far from the crowds, New Zealand -- where sheep outnumber humans by a ratio of nearly twelve to one -- can‘t be beat.

The best part of this country is the view. Comprised of two main islands just 1,000 miles east of Australia, New Zealand is a country of many landscapes. If you‘re an ocean-lover, you‘ll find a variety of sandy, golden beaches and miles of gorgeous coastline. If hiking and forests are calling your name, take some time to walk in the country‘s pristine forests while exploring the fauna (like the kea parrot, known as one of the world‘s most intelligent birds; or the weka, a flightless bird with a love for shiny objects).

Before You Go: Need-to-know info
Entry requirements: Valid passport
Language: English
Currency: New Zealand dollars (NZ$)
Flight time: About 12 hours from Los Angeles 

When To Go
Best weather: New Zealand‘s seasons are the opposite of the United States. So the warmest months for New Zealand are in December, January, and February; and the coldest are in June, July, and August. The best times to visit are between September and April during New Zealand‘s fall, summer, and spring.

What To Do
Take a ride: Arrange for a helicopter tour (try GlacierSouthernLakes.co.nz) through New Zealand‘s snowcapped Southern Alps, making your way to Milford Sound, one of the most stunning fjords in the world. You‘ll get a dramatic up-close view of the remote waterside canyons and on your way back to Queenstown; you‘ll stop off on a remote glacier, the perfect spot for a champagne toast for two. 
Island hop: Take a ferry to one of New Zealand‘s many smaller offshore islands. Go from Auckland to Waiheke Island, which is known for its vineyards and olive groves, to sample the wine; or jet over to Great Barrier Island, a much more rugged, adventurous escape, known for its rare wildlife sightings and secluded hot springs. 
See the maritime life: One of New Zealand‘s most famous marine reserves is on Poor Knights Island, where you‘ll find amazing natural caves and archways, and a wide range of sea life in all colors of the rainbow -- Poor Knights has been even been called one of the world‘s top dive sites.
-- Anja Winikka If you want to be far from the crowds, New Zealand -- where sheep outnumber humans by a ratio of nearly twelve to one -- can‘t be beat.

The best part of this country is the view. Comprised of two main islands just 1,000 miles east of Australia, New Zealand is a country of many landscapes. If you‘re an ocean-lover, you‘ll find a variety of sandy, golden beaches and miles of gorgeous coastline. If hiking and forests are calling your name, take some time to walk in the country‘s pristine forests while exploring the fauna (like the kea parrot, known as one of the world‘s most intelligent birds; or the weka, a flightless bird with a love for shiny objects).

Before You Go: Need-to-know info
Entry requirements: Valid passport
Language: English
Currency: New Zealand dollars (NZ$)
Flight time: About 12 hours from Los Angeles 

When To Go
Best weather: New Zealand‘s seasons are the opposite of the United States. So the warmest months for New Zealand are in December, January, and February; and the coldest are in June, July, and August. The best times to visit are between September and April during New Zealand‘s fall, summer, and spring.

What To Do
Take a ride: Arrange for a helicopter tour (try GlacierSouthernLakes.co.nz) through New Zealand‘s snowcapped Southern Alps, making your way to Milford Sound, one of the most stunning fjords in the world. You‘ll get a dramatic up-close view of the remote waterside canyons and on your way back to Queenstown; you‘ll stop off on a remote glacier, the perfect spot for a champagne toast for two. 
Island hop: Take a ferry to one of New Zealand‘s many smaller offshore islands. Go from Auckland to Waiheke Island, which is known for its vineyards and olive groves, to sample the wine; or jet over to Great Barrier Island, a much more rugged, adventurous escape, known for its rare wildlife sightings and secluded hot springs. 
See the maritime life: One of New Zealand‘s most famous marine reserves is on Poor Knights Island, where you‘ll find amazing natural caves and archways, and a wide range of sea life in all colors of the rainbow -- Poor Knights has been even been called one of the world‘s top dive sites.
-- Anja Winikka
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New Zealand Honeymoons

Hawaii + Pacific Honeymoons

If you want to be far from the crowds, New Zealand -- where sheep outnumber humans by a ratio of nearly twelve to one -- can't be beat.

The best part of this country is the view. Comprised of two main islands just 1,000 miles east of Australia, New Zealand is a country of many landscapes. If you're an ocean-lover, you'll find a variety of sandy, golden beaches and miles of gorgeous coastline. If hiking and forests are calling your name, take some time to walk in the country's pristine forests while exploring the fauna (like the kea parrot, known as one of the world's most intelligent birds; or the weka, a flightless bird with a love for shiny objects).

Before You Go: Need-to-know info

Entry requirements: Valid passport
Language: English
Currency: New Zealand dollars (NZ$)
Flight time: About 12 hours from Los Angeles

When To Go

Best weather: New Zealand's seasons are the opposite of the United States. So the warmest months for New Zealand are in December, January, and February; and the coldest are in June, July, and August. The best times to visit are between September and April during New Zealand's fall, summer, and spring.

What To Do

Take a ride: Arrange for a helicopter tour (try GlacierSouthernLakes.co.nz) through New Zealand's snowcapped Southern Alps, making your way to Milford Sound, one of the most stunning fjords in the world. You'll get a dramatic up-close view of the remote waterside canyons and on your way back to Queenstown; you'll stop off on a remote glacier, the perfect spot for a champagne toast for two.

Island hop: Take a ferry to one of New Zealand's many smaller offshore islands. Go from Auckland to Waiheke Island, which is known for its vineyards and olive groves, to sample the wine; or jet over to Great Barrier Island, a much more rugged, adventurous escape, known for its rare wildlife sightings and secluded hot springs.

See the maritime life: One of New Zealand's most famous marine reserves is on Poor Knights Island, where you'll find amazing natural caves and archways, and a wide range of sea life in all colors of the rainbow -- Poor Knights has been even been called one of the world's top dive sites.

-- Anja Winikka