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Thais commonly use the word sanuk when talking about their Southeast Asian kingdom, which means "fun." Yes, within Thailand‘s tropical terrain lies a sensory sojourn for travelers -- the eye candy of ornate gilded palaces, rich coral reefs, and many varieties of wild orchid; the hypnotic rhythms of Buddhist mantras; the palate-pleasing platters of spicy cuisine; the tactile allure of rustling Thai silk; and the aromatic odyssey of bustling bazaars.

Before You Go: Need-to-know info
Entry requirements: Valid passport
Language: Thai
Currency: Baht
Flight time: 19 1/2 hours from NYC, 17 hours from L.A., 19 hours from Dallas

When To Go
Best weather: November to January is the "dry and cool" season, though the rest of the year can be just as fair. Be prepared for hot, humid weather any time of year, though there are three recognizable seasons: summer from February to May; rainy from June to September; and cooler from November to February. 

Best prices: Mid-May to mid-October, exact dates vary by hotel

What To Do
Get to Bangkok: Just as New York City doesn‘t define the total American experience, Bangkok isn‘t representative of all of Thailand. This is a huge metropolis: Neon billboards and high-rises flank humble temples and the traffic -- consisting of cars and rickshaws -- is nearly always congested. The paradox is exactly what makes the city interesting. Check out Chinatown, a ramble of lanes near Yaowarat and Charoen Krung roads, browse the shops on Charoen Krung for kitschy souvenirs, dare to peek into one of the "dance" clubs in Patpong, Bangkok‘s notorious red-light district, and definitely do not miss the Grand Palace. 

Hike the hills: Strap on those hiking shoes for ventures into northwestern Thailand and the infamous opium-growing Golden Triangle, where Thailand borders Burma and Laos. Chiang Mai, "the rose of the North" about an hour‘s flight from Bangkok, is the gateway to this mountainous region. From here you can explore the city‘s countless wats, including the awe-inspiring mountaintop Wat Phrathat Doi Suthep, and take a pachyderm pleasure ride, drift down the Mae Tang River on a bamboo raft, explore the stunning Doi Inthanon National Park, and trek to remote villages inhabited by colorful hill tribes (some of whose lifestyles have barely changed over the centuries, while others now kowtow to the tourist dollar). 

Hit the sand: Spin the compass south toward the narrow peninsula of southern Thailand for picturesque beaches, a rich diversity of coral life, and exotic seascapes punctuated by towering and dramatic limestone stacks jutting out of the water. Skip Pattaya (way too touristy), but do head for Phuket and Ko Samui, both island beauties easily reached by air from Bangkok. Phuket is Thailand‘s largest and poshest island -- with ample dive and sailing facilities plus striking scenery make it a hot destination. Ko Samui, in the Gulf of Thailand is blanketed with coconut palms and rimmed with white sand and aquamarine waters. Beside lazing around, water sports, principally sail boarding and diving (Ang Thong Marine National Park is nearby), will occupy your days.
-- Lori Seto & Dan Klinglesmith Thais commonly use the word sanuk when talking about their Southeast Asian kingdom, which means "fun." Yes, within Thailand‘s tropical terrain lies a sensory sojourn for travelers -- the eye candy of ornate gilded palaces, rich coral reefs, and many varieties of wild orchid; the hypnotic rhythms of Buddhist mantras; the palate-pleasing platters of spicy cuisine; the tactile allure of rustling Thai silk; and the aromatic odyssey of bustling bazaars.

Before You Go: Need-to-know info
Entry requirements: Valid passport
Language: Thai
Currency: Baht
Flight time: 19 1/2 hours from NYC, 17 hours from L.A., 19 hours from Dallas

When To Go
Best weather: November to January is the "dry and cool" season, though the rest of the year can be just as fair. Be prepared for hot, humid weather any time of year, though there are three recognizable seasons: summer from February to May; rainy from June to September; and cooler from November to February. 

Best prices: Mid-May to mid-October, exact dates vary by hotel

What To Do
Get to Bangkok: Just as New York City doesn‘t define the total American experience, Bangkok isn‘t representative of all of Thailand. This is a huge metropolis: Neon billboards and high-rises flank humble temples and the traffic -- consisting of cars and rickshaws -- is nearly always congested. The paradox is exactly what makes the city interesting. Check out Chinatown, a ramble of lanes near Yaowarat and Charoen Krung roads, browse the shops on Charoen Krung for kitschy souvenirs, dare to peek into one of the "dance" clubs in Patpong, Bangkok‘s notorious red-light district, and definitely do not miss the Grand Palace. 

Hike the hills: Strap on those hiking shoes for ventures into northwestern Thailand and the infamous opium-growing Golden Triangle, where Thailand borders Burma and Laos. Chiang Mai, "the rose of the North" about an hour‘s flight from Bangkok, is the gateway to this mountainous region. From here you can explore the city‘s countless wats, including the awe-inspiring mountaintop Wat Phrathat Doi Suthep, and take a pachyderm pleasure ride, drift down the Mae Tang River on a bamboo raft, explore the stunning Doi Inthanon National Park, and trek to remote villages inhabited by colorful hill tribes (some of whose lifestyles have barely changed over the centuries, while others now kowtow to the tourist dollar). 

Hit the sand: Spin the compass south toward the narrow peninsula of southern Thailand for picturesque beaches, a rich diversity of coral life, and exotic seascapes punctuated by towering and dramatic limestone stacks jutting out of the water. Skip Pattaya (way too touristy), but do head for Phuket and Ko Samui, both island beauties easily reached by air from Bangkok. Phuket is Thailand‘s largest and poshest island -- with ample dive and sailing facilities plus striking scenery make it a hot destination. Ko Samui, in the Gulf of Thailand is blanketed with coconut palms and rimmed with white sand and aquamarine waters. Beside lazing around, water sports, principally sail boarding and diving (Ang Thong Marine National Park is nearby), will occupy your days.
-- Lori Seto & Dan Klinglesmith
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Thailand

Asia Honeymoons

Thais commonly use the word sanuk when talking about their Southeast Asian kingdom, which means "fun." Yes, within Thailand's tropical terrain lies a sensory sojourn for travelers -- the eye candy of ornate gilded palaces, rich coral reefs, and many varieties of wild orchid; the hypnotic rhythms of Buddhist mantras; the palate-pleasing platters of spicy cuisine; the tactile allure of rustling Thai silk; and the aromatic odyssey of bustling bazaars.

Before You Go: Need-to-know info

Entry requirements: Valid passport
Language: Thai
Currency: Baht
Flight time: 19 1/2 hours from NYC, 17 hours from L.A., 19 hours from Dallas

When To Go

Best weather: November to January is the "dry and cool" season, though the rest of the year can be just as fair. Be prepared for hot, humid weather any time of year, though there are three recognizable seasons: summer from February to May; rainy from June to September; and cooler from November to February.
Best prices: Mid-May to mid-October, exact dates vary by hotel

What To Do

Get to Bangkok: Just as New York City doesn't define the total American experience, Bangkok isn't representative of all of Thailand. This is a huge metropolis: Neon billboards and high-rises flank humble temples and the traffic -- consisting of cars and rickshaws -- is nearly always congested. The paradox is exactly what makes the city interesting. Check out Chinatown, a ramble of lanes near Yaowarat and Charoen Krung roads, browse the shops on Charoen Krung for kitschy souvenirs, dare to peek into one of the "dance" clubs in Patpong, Bangkok's notorious red-light district, and definitely do not miss the Grand Palace.

Hike the hills: Strap on those hiking shoes for ventures into northwestern Thailand and the infamous opium-growing Golden Triangle, where Thailand borders Burma and Laos. Chiang Mai, "the rose of the North" about an hour's flight from Bangkok, is the gateway to this mountainous region. From here you can explore the city's countless wats, including the awe-inspiring mountaintop Wat Phrathat Doi Suthep, and take a pachyderm pleasure ride, drift down the Mae Tang River on a bamboo raft, explore the stunning Doi Inthanon National Park, and trek to remote villages inhabited by colorful hill tribes (some of whose lifestyles have barely changed over the centuries, while others now kowtow to the tourist dollar).

Hit the sand: Spin the compass south toward the narrow peninsula of southern Thailand for picturesque beaches, a rich diversity of coral life, and exotic seascapes punctuated by towering and dramatic limestone stacks jutting out of the water. Skip Pattaya (way too touristy), but do head for Phuket and Ko Samui, both island beauties easily reached by air from Bangkok. Phuket is Thailand's largest and poshest island -- with ample dive and sailing facilities plus striking scenery make it a hot destination. Ko Samui, in the Gulf of Thailand is blanketed with coconut palms and rimmed with white sand and aquamarine waters. Beside lazing around, water sports, principally sail boarding and diving (Ang Thong Marine National Park is nearby), will occupy your days.

-- Lori Seto & Dan Klinglesmith